Inside the Studio

Visit with Adam Frezza & Terri Chiao

We stop by the bright and colorful Bushwick studio of artist duo Adam Frezza and Terri Chiao to see new projects, from nubbins and collage to large-scale paper islands.

Read a full interview on Amadeus Mag.

Photos by Jen Brister

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Slant

“A lot of our projects emerge from dialogue that we have together, sometimes stemming from experiences, like walking in the woods or something and looking at the trees like, woah, it would be cool to do some play on that if they we’re all frozen… I think the act of being out in the world and looking at things is like an open space for your mind to move around together, to come up with ideas together, to decide how to start going about it.”

— Terri Chiao

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Slant

“ I love the moments when we start to forget who thought of something and loosen that ownership. That play aspect sets up a certain rigor so that we’re not just playing all the time; our play has some scheduling. We call it our class schedule.”

— Adam Frezza

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Slant

“I find with her architecture background, we might make something small in studio not thinking of it as a model, but her history in architecture gives anything the potential to be a large-scale object. ”

— Adam Frezza

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Slant

“For “Paper Plants,” we noticed we were getting junk mail from places and we didn’t know why they were sending us all this paper. So, we’ve been taking this paper, shredding it and making a pulp. It costs us next to nothing, just bringing it to a workable form. It’s neat to see something come from nothing; it would be litter if we didn’t.”

— Adam Frezza

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Slant

“A lot of times, we really like the immediacy of our process. We can work directly with no heavy equipment, and in that way there’s immediacy that we hope comes across as an immediacy in experience.”

— Terri Chiao

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