Meet

Fanny Allié

Where are you from and where do you reside?
I am from Montpellier in the South of France and I live in Brooklyn, NY.
Do you find that your location strongly influences the direction of your work?
Living in the city definitely influences my work and living in New York City especially. I think that my location has a big impact on my work, what I see, what I find in an urban setting will necessarily be different than if I was living in a small village somewhere with very few people to interact with on a daily basis.
How has your work developed in the past few years, and how do you see it evolving in the future?
It’s been evolving in a way that I like: more organic, intuitive, and less controlled.
Are you formally trained?
I went to a public photography school in Arles, France. After school, I experimented with different medium and materials on my own.
Did your earlier photography relate to the kinds of subjects you’re interested in today?
When I first started photography at 16, I was staging and photographing my family (especially my two sisters). Later on, in school, I videotaped a lot of people, mostly men found through ads, and I filmed them while I was hitchhiking.
When did you begin your current practice?
I started the collagraphic work almost a year ago while doing the Robert Blackburn Printmaking fellowship program at the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts.
Why was collagraphy the method you decided to work with?
I didn’t know anything about printmaking and collagraphy before starting the fellowship program. Collagraphy is a continuation of my collage practice so I was naturally drawn to it.
Slant
What I find in an urban setting will necessarily be different than if I was living in a small village somewhere with very few people to interact with on a daily basis. — Fanny Allié
Are there any aspects of your process that are left to chance?
My creative process is actually based on chance. It starts with the materials I collect. Since I use a lot of found/reused elements, there is always a part of my work that’s dictated by chance. Also since I’ve started with printmaking, the chance/accidents component is present since it’s hard to fully control the result. My practice is a mix of accidental or chance elements with something more intentional.
How do you choose your materials?
I use what I come across, used, recycled, and found materials, plastic, paper, fabric… anything that I can cut into, sew, or glue.
Since your work relies so much on found materials, what goes into your decision-making with respect to the kinds of materials you’ll use versus leave behind?
I don’t really make any decision beforehand, I collect everything that appeals to me, but sometimes I end up not using certain items because they just don’t fit with the rest. I start playing around with my material and see what works, what doesn’t, and what connections I can create between the different elements.
Where do you find your day-to-day inspiration?
Everywhere around me, I just need to pay attention and observe. Going to museums and galleries is also a source of inspiration.
What is the most difficult part of the artistic process for you?
The most difficult part is to constantly renew myself, find new ideas, new directions. It can be draining sometimes.

Slant
I start playing around with my material and see what works, what doesn’t, and what connections I can create between the different elements. — Fanny Allié
Have you ever collaborated, or would you?
My art-making process is pretty solitary, I don’t mind spending hours on my own without speaking to anyone. I haven’t really collaborated in the past, I could if it was on a specific project.
Do you admire or draw inspiration from any of your peers who are also working now?
Of course, there are many artists working now that I’m inspired by such as Wangeshi Mutu, Nick Cave, Ghada Amer, Huma Bhabha, Marcel Dzama, and many more.
Are you influenced by any artist that does something completely different than you?
I read a lot of novels and I can get influenced by authors and books, words are very powerful and they give more depth to life.

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